Medical School Application Guide

The Medical School Application Guide

 
 

Our mission: Helping individuals become doctors

 
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Barts & The London School of Medicine & Dentistry

The Medical School Application Guide

At a Glance

Courses available

4 to 6-year programme

  Undergraduate Applicants Graduate Applicants
  5-year 6-year 4-year 5-year
No. of places 253   39 253
Degree N/A N/A 2.1* 2.1
GCSEs AAABBB C in English & Maths None None
A levels AAAb AAB-BBB B in Bio + Chem B in Bio + Chem
Exam UKCAT UKCAT UKCAT UKCAT
Interview Panel Panel Panel + activities Panel
Work experience Highly important Highly important Highly important Highly important
 
 

Go To University

  • " It gives an excellent insight into the strategic issues involved in applying to Medicine. "


    - Pamela Andrew, Careers Adviser -- University of St. Andrews -

  • " It is easy to read and is a great place to go for all the information that seems dispersed amongst so many different sources. It"s great that it gets updated every year - because things seem to change so frequently. "

    - Jo Hutchings, Career Adviser -- University of Bristol -

  • " The Medical School Application Guide contains all the detailed information needed by both Career Advisers and Students. The information is current and updated each year. It is an invaluable resource for all Careers Advisers in this field and the essential handbook for students applying to this demanding and rewarding profession. "
    - Agnes Finley, Careers Consultant -- Lancaster University -

  • " I think your books are excellent. I have used them with students and graduates, and Careers Adviser colleagues have also found them invaluable in giving advice regarding such a niche area of the graduate labour market. "

    - Stephen Shilton, Careers Adviser -- University of Glasgow -

 
  • When medical schools review applications for places on their courses, there is a lengthy and in-depth selection process to choose their desired applicants. Nowadays, this process includes analysing academic background; aptitude test performance; and personal statements, which demonstrate a candidate’s motivation, communication skills, empathy, team-working skills etc. It also considers work experience, voluntary activities and positions of leadership. Often, all of these things are looked at, before a candidate is even invited to interview. You might well wonder, with medical school places being so oversubscribed, why admissions boards will go to these lengths to select future doctors.


    Read More
  • There is a wide variety of policies that medical schools in the UK use when considering your undergraduate degree subject in their selection process. Barts and the London School of Medicine accept any degree if a graduate applies to their 5-year programme but require a degree in a scientific or healthcare discipline if an applicant applies to their 4-year programme. As a contrast to this, Newcastle medical school accepts a degree in any discipline for their 4 year and 5 year programmes. Even more surprising to some will be the university of Nottingham who only accepts applicants with a science undergraduate degree to their 5-year programme, but accepts students with a degree in any discipline to their 4-year programme.

    Read More
  • With entry to medical school remaining highly competitive, top A level grades are important to get in to all 5-year and 6-year programmes as well as to get in to some of the 4-year graduate courses. However, as you will see on each university’s page, there are some programmes (particularly 4-year programmes) that do not consider A-level grades at all. St George's University of London's 4-year programme for graduates is one of these.


    Read More
  • Medical ethics has a long history from the days of Hippocrates to the present. Ethics are dynamic and the same ethical principles are not necessarily followed the world over. Medical ethics will quickly become part of your life upon gaining a place at medical school but an appreciation of modern medical ethics is also a necessary tool at your medical school interview.


    Read More
  • You will vote on the 23rd June 2016 to stay in or to leave the EU. Beyond the meaningless political debates, what are the potential consequences of a Brexit for what matters to us here: the UK National Health Service and health policy?



    Read More
  • The day starts with the ward round. This is usually a civilised affair; the patients are brought to us, and there are never more than four of them. These patients will have complex and serious eye conditions which need intense treatment and input. For example, there are those with severe corneal ulcers requiring antibiotic drops every 30 minutes (in an ideal world this would literally be up to 48 times per day (!!), however we do recognise our patients’ need for uninterrupted sleep!). In these patients, we are trying to stop the infection destroying their cornea and causing a corneal perforation.

    Read More
  • When medical schools review applications for places on their courses, there is a lengthy and in-depth selection process to choose their desired applicants. Nowadays, this process includes analysing academic background; aptitude test performance; and personal statements, which demonstrate a candidate’s motivation, communication skills, empathy, team-working skills etc. It also considers work experience, voluntary activities and positions of leadership. Often, all of these things are looked at, before a candidate is even invited to interview. You might well wonder, with medical school places being so oversubscribed, why admissions boards will go to these lengths to select future doctors.


    Read More
  • There is a wide variety of policies that medical schools in the UK use when considering your undergraduate degree subject in their selection process. Barts and the London School of Medicine accept any degree if a graduate applies to their 5-year programme but require a degree in a scientific or healthcare discipline if an applicant applies to their 4-year programme. As a contrast to this, Newcastle medical school accepts a degree in any discipline for their 4 year and 5 year programmes. Even more surprising to some will be the university of Nottingham who only accepts applicants with a science undergraduate degree to their 5-year programme, but accepts students with a degree in any discipline to their 4-year programme.

    Read More
  • With entry to medical school remaining highly competitive, top A level grades are important to get in to all 5-year and 6-year programmes as well as to get in to some of the 4-year graduate courses. However, as you will see on each university’s page, there are some programmes (particularly 4-year programmes) that do not consider A-level grades at all. St George's University of London's 4-year programme for graduates is one of these.


    Read More
  • Medical ethics has a long history from the days of Hippocrates to the present. Ethics are dynamic and the same ethical principles are not necessarily followed the world over. Medical ethics will quickly become part of your life upon gaining a place at medical school but an appreciation of modern medical ethics is also a necessary tool at your medical school interview.


    Read More
  • You will vote on the 23rd June 2016 to stay in or to leave the EU. Beyond the meaningless political debates, what are the potential consequences of a Brexit for what matters to us here: the UK National Health Service and health policy?



    Read More
  • The day starts with the ward round. This is usually a civilised affair; the patients are brought to us, and there are never more than four of them. These patients will have complex and serious eye conditions which need intense treatment and input. For example, there are those with severe corneal ulcers requiring antibiotic drops every 30 minutes (in an ideal world this would literally be up to 48 times per day (!!), however we do recognise our patients’ need for uninterrupted sleep!). In these patients, we are trying to stop the infection destroying their cornea and causing a corneal perforation.

    Read More