Imperial College London
University: Imperial College London

Imperial College London was officially founded in 1909, but its medical school origins date back to 1823, when the Charing Cross Hospital Medical School began to train apprentice doctors. Situated in central London, a stone’s throw from the Science Museum and the Natural History Museum, Imperial College is renowned all over the world for its excellence in the field of scientific research. There are so many notable alumni over its history that you could be forgiven for finding it a little daunting! Alexander Fleming and John Snow (who famously linked the 1854 cholera outbreak in London to the water supply and prompted a major advance in public health), are some of the medical alumni, but the college is also famous for business and engineering and Nicholas Tombazis, chief car designer at McLaren and Ferrari (for those of you interested in Formula 1!) also studied here. Undergraduates and non-science graduates can apply to a 6-year medical programme, which includes an integrated BSc (subjects range from Pharmacology to ‘Death, Autopsy and the Law’). Science graduates can apply to a 5-year programme, without the integrated BSc. The graduate programme offers additional benefits, such as opportunities for training in medical education, and opportunities to get involved in clinical research projects in the first two years. For both course, there is early patient contact and the first two years have a strong focus on the scientific principles behind Medicine. Teaching is delivered through lectures, tutorials and problem-based learning sessions. The clinical years conclude with preparation for practice as a Foundation doctor. Accommodation is guaranteed for first year undergraduate students, and the university offers a wide range of recreational and voluntary activities for students. Added to this, you will be studying in one of the most vibrant and exciting cities in the world.

University: Imperial College London

Undergraduate Applicants

  • Minimum Admission Criteria
  • No. of places
  • Degree
  • GCSEs
  • A levels
  • Exam
  • Interview
  • Work experience
  • 6-year programme
  • 283
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • A*AA
  • BMAT
  • Panel
  • Essential

Graduate Applicants

  • Minimum Admission Criteria
  • No. of places
  • Degree
  • GCSEs
  • A levels
  • Exam
  • Interview
  • Work experience
  • 5-year programme
  • 30
  • 2:1*
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • BMAT
  • Panel
  • Essential
  • 6-year programme
  • 283
  • 2:1*
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • BMAT
  • Panel
  • Essential
*Biological science degree

Undergraduates can apply to the 6-year programme with an integrated BSc year included. A wide range of subjects can be studied in this year, including Arts-based subjects, such as Medical Humanities. For candidates interested in pursuing further research, there is the opportunity to apply for the MBBS PhD programme during your medical degree. Successful students will go on to complete a PhD following their BSc year, and will then complete the final years of the clinical programme.

Note that Imperial College London offers a medical degree jointly with the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, aimed primarily at applicants from Singapore. More information can be found at: http://www.lkcmedicine.ntu.edu.sg/admissions/Pages/Entry-Requirements-And-Selection-Criteria.aspx

A/AS levels and GCSEs

The standard A level offer is A*AA. For 2018 entry, applicants are required to have taken both Chemistry and Biology and must have achieve an A* in one of those subjects with a minimum of an A grade in the other. A third A grade must be achieved in another subject. General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted. The Extended Project Qualification is not part of the A level requirements. A levels must be achieved in the same sitting. GCSEs no longer form part of the entry requirements.

IB

38 points are required overall with 6 in both Chemistry and Biology at Higher Level. If Chemistry or Biology only offered to Standard Level, another science subject or Mathematics may be considered as a substitute at Higher Level. Grade 5 in Standard Level English is also required.

Admissions Exam

The BMAT is required and is valid for one year.

Access to Medicine courses

Not accepted.

Other Diplomas

The Cambridge Pre-U is accepted with three Principal Subjects, to include Biology and Chemistry, with grades of D2 in either Biology or Chemistry, and D3 or higher in an additional science or mathematics subject.

Widening Participation

Imperial College runs a Pathway to Medicine programme for school students from low and middle income families who have the academic potential to achieve the grades for Medicine. This is run in partnership with the Sutton Trust. It is a 3-year programme that runs throughout Years 11, 12 and 13 and consists of various activities aimed at encouraging students to make informed decisions about studying medicine and providing guidance and advice to those who do so. The scheme consists of a series of talks by admissions tutors and medical students as well as e-mentoring with current Imperial medical students. There is also an opportunity to attend a summer school at the College where students can receive personal statement advice. More importantly, all Pathways to Medicine students are guaranteed work experience in a healthcare setting.

Those who meet all the following criteria are eligible to register for the programme:

  • In year 11 at the time of application
  • Attend a non-selective state school
  • Live and attend school within the M25 (and are able to travel to South Kensington Campus)
  • Able to provide contact details for a teacher who will provide a reference

For more information about this programme, please visit:
www.imperial.ac.uk/be-inspired/student-recruitment-and-outreach/schools-and-colleges/students/on-campus-activities/programmes/pathways-to-medicine/

International Students

Approximately 18 international students are accepted onto the course each year. The medical school requests that you contact its admissions team (medicine.ug.admissions@imperial.ac.uk) if you do not have A levels or the IB, to supply full details of your qualifications. English Language requirements can be met by grade B in GCSE English, or there are a number of suitable alternatives, listed in the following webpage: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/apply/requirements/english/

If you are applying as an overseas student and taken qualifications other than those listed above, please contact us by email (enquiries@themsag.com) if you would like more information on the minimum grades needed to be considered for a place in Medicine at Imperial.

Policy on Deferrals

The School of Medicine welcomes applications from school leavers who wish to take a gap year. You must state in your UCAS personal statement how you propose to spend your time. Deferred entry applications from overseas applicants are not normally accepted.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Applications via UCAS for 2018/19 entry for both undergraduate programmes are open from 6thSeptember 2017 and close on 15th October 2017.

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS

  • Completed UCAS application form
  • International students with qualifications which are not listed above, should also contact the medical school admissions team with the relevant details about their qualifications: medicine.ug.admissions@imperial.ac.uk

SELECTION PROCESS

If a candidate fulfils the minimum academic requirements, and scores above the cut-off marks in their BMAT examination that year (the cut-off changes from year to year, based on the cohort of candidates taking the exam – please see below for the cut-off scores for 2017 entry), their entire application will then be reviewed by the admissions team. The following criteria will be assessed:

  • A level or equivalent predicted (or achieved) grades
  • BMAT scores - For 2017 entry, the minimum scores required were:
    • a score of 4.5 in section 1
    • a score of 4.6 in section 2
    • a score of 2.5 and grade B in section 3
  • Evidence of commitment to the values of the NHS Constitution (see: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-nhs-constitution-for-england)
  • Motivation and understanding of medicine as a career
  • Community activities
  • Leadership and teamwork
  • Extracurricular interests
  • Referee’s report

INTERVIEW

Once selected for interview, offers are made primarily on the basis of interview performance. The interview is panel-style and lasts approximately 15 minutes. The panel consists of a chairperson, two other members of the admissions selection team, a senior medical student and a lay person. You will be assessed on the following:

  • Motivation and realistic approach to medicine as a career
  • Capacity to deal with stressful situations
  • Evidence of commitment to the values of the NHS constitution (see above)
  • Evidence of working as both a leader and a team member
  • Ability to multi-task
  • Likely contribution to university life
  • Communication skills and maturity of character

Note that candidates who have performed exceptionally well at interview, may be invited to compete for various scholarships available at the university. Application for scholarship is normally in the form of an essay.

In 2016, for the A100 course, the university received 1970 Home/EU applicants of which they interviewed 693 and made 478 offers for approximately 300 places. There were 624 overseas applications of which 73 were interviewed for approximately 20 places.

Medicine at Imperial College London is ranked 11th in the UK by the Guardian University Guide 2018.

It is ranked 8th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2018.

In the QS World University Rankings, Imperial is number 12 for Medicine.

Graduates with a biological science degree can apply for the 5-year programme, which is similar to the undergraduate 6-year programme, without the integrated BSc year. However in the first two years, graduates will have additional opportunities compared to undergraduates, such as undertaking a clinical research project and undertaking training in educating others. During their 2nd year, graduates will have the opportunity to act as Graduate Teaching Assistants. This makes the course very appealing for those graduates who are interested in pursuing an academic clinical career.

Graduates with a non-science degree can only apply to the 6-year programme, and must complete the integrated BSc year.

For candidates interested in pursuing further research, there is the opportunity to apply for the MBBS PhD programme during your medical degree. Successful students will go on to complete a PhD following the BSc year of the 6-year programme, or following the 2nd year of the 5-year programme. They will then complete the final years of the clinical programme.

The university recommends checking their website before completing an application as the curriculum is currently under review.

Degree and A levels 

For the 5-year programme, a 2:1 BSc or a PhD in a biological science-based degree is the minimum requirement. Applicants will need to check that their degree fulfils certain subject criteria by completing a check-list (https://www.imperial.ac.uk/media/imperial-college/study/public/Graduate-Medicine-Checklist-2015.pdf), which will need to be signed by their course tutor and submitted to the Imperial admissions team if the applicant is invited for interview.

Graduates who do not meet the degree criteria for the 5-year programme, may apply to the 6-year programme. A 2:1 degree in any discipline is the minimum entry requirement

GCSEs

There are no GCSE requirements for graduates.

IB Eligibility

Graduates will only be considered based on their undergraduate degree achievements.

Admissions Exam

The BMAT is required and is valid for one year.

Access to Medicine courses

Not accepted

International Students

A small number of international students (7 in 2015) are accepted on to the 5-year programme each year. Up to 18 international students will be accepted for the 6-year programme (including both graduates and undergraduates). Candidates should submit their degree transcript to the Imperial admissions team (medicine.ug.admissions@imperial.ac.uk) when they submit their UCAS applications.

English Language requirements can be met by grade B in GCSE English, or there are a number of suitable alternatives, listed in the following webpage:
https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/apply/requirements/english/

If you are applying as an overseas student and taken qualifications other than those listed above, please contact us by email (enquiries@themsag.com) if you would like more information on the minimum grades needed to be considered for a place in Medicine at Imperial.

Policy on Deferrals

Candidates wishing to apply for deferred entry to the course must explain how they wish to spend their time in the UCAS personal statement.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Applications via UCAS for 2018/19 entry for both programmes are open from 6th September 2017 and close on 15th October 2017

Application Documents

  • Completed UCAS application form
  • International graduates should submit their degree transcript directly to the Imperial admissions team at the time of application
  • At interview, applicants to the 5-year programme, may be requested to provide a checklist signed by their undergraduate tutor, to ensure they fulfil the necessary subject requirements

SELECTION PROCESS

If a candidate fulfils the minimum academic requirements, and scores above the cut-off marks in their BMAT examination that year (the cut-off changes from year to year, based on the cohort of candidates taking the exam – please see below for the cut-off scores for 2017 entry), their entire application will then be reviewed by the admissions team. The following criteria will be assessed:

  • Previous grades/academic performance and content of previous degree(s)
  • BMAT scores - For 2017 entry, the minimum scores required were:
    • a score of 4.5 in section 1
    • a score of 4.6 in section 2
    • a score of 2.5 and grade B in section 3
  • Evidence of commitment to the values of the NHS Constitution (see: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-nhs-constitution-for-england)
  • Motivation and understanding of medicine as a career
  • Community activities
  • Leadership and teamwork
  • Extracurricular interests
  • Referee’s report

INTERVIEW

Once selected for interview, offers are made primarily on the basis of interview performance. The interview is panel-style and lasts approximately 15 minutes. The panel consists of a chairperson, two other members of the admissions selection team, a senior medical student and a lay person. You will be assessed on the following:

  • Motivation and realistic approach to medicine as a career
  • Capacity to deal with stressful situations
  • Evidence of commitment to the values of the NHS constitution (see above)
  • Evidence of working as both a leader and a team member
  • Ability to multi-task
  • Likely contribution to university life
  • Communication skills and maturity of character

Note that candidates who have performed exceptionally well at interview, may be invited to compete for various scholarships available at the university. Application for scholarship is normally in the form of an essay.

In 2016, for the A100 course, the university received 1970 Home/EU applicants of which they interviewed 693 and made 478 offers for approximately 300 places. There were 624 overseas applications of which 73 were interviewed for approximately 20 places.

For the A109 course, there were 387 applicants of which they interviewed 47 candidates and made 30 offers for approximately 20 places. There were 68 overseas applicants of which 9 candidates were interviewed for 2 places.

Medicine at Imperial College London is ranked 11th in the UK by the Guardian University Guide 2018.

It is ranked 8th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2018.

In the QS World University Rankings, Imperial is number 12 for Medicine.

  1. 1. Good things about studying medicine at imperial

    Imperial is a leading institute for medicine in the country. It offers a didactic 2-year introduction to medicine followed by 3 years of clinical experience which meant that you entered the clinical attachments with enough knowledge to make them useful. As an international research centre there was also plenty of opportunity to not only learn for the best but become involved with top end research early in your medical career. Being in the centre of London also offered a fantastic student experience at an affordable cost. And there are also the iPads provided to students by the university during the clinical years to improve student morale! Dr Irum Sunderji

    There are a number of benefits to studying Medicine at Imperial. First of all, it has an excellent reputation worldwide of having a fantastic, reputable medical school which is regularly carrying out cutting edge research. The teaching hospitals are some of the best in London where consultants who are experts throughout the world in their speciality work. The main campus, as well as many of the halls of residence, is in South Kensington which means that Hyde Park, Knightsbridge and High Street Kensington are all on your doorstep.

    The course structure provides solid scientific understanding of the medical sciences like physiology, anatomy, biochemistry and cell biology but also involves early patient contact in the first year. By talking to ‘real’ patients with ‘real’ illnesses on hospital wards, you will not become lost in the intricacies of pure science but start to prepare to be a doctor.

    Regarding extra-curricular activities, Imperial College has one of the largest number of clubs and societies of all the universities in the UK so there is something for everyone to get involved with in their spare time. It has a great rivalry with the other London medical schools which is always good to watch on the sports field in the United Hospitals’ competitions. Nikhil Patel, Final year medical student

  2. 2. What is not so good about medicine?

    Due to the world renowned status of imperial college the competitive feel within the university is particularly high compared with other universities. Although the teaching is very good, it does sometimes take away from training opportunities as there are so many trainees within many of the teaching hospitals already. Prior to qualification I had not had much experience in simple procedures e.g. Bloods and cannulas, although these were skills I quickly picked up during my f1 year. Dr Irum Sunderji

    Living in London, albeit a lot of fun, can get quite expensive, especially considering it is a 6 year course. Nikhil Patel, Final year medical student

  3. 3. Advice for someone thinking of studying here

    The competition to get in to Imperial College is very fierce and in order to be successful you will need to have a strong academic record as well as a healthy amount of work experience behind you. Once you are a student at Imperial, working hard will come naturally, but remember to play as hard as you work. Dr Irum Sunderji

    Definitely apply to Imperial! Its course structure is varied, and ensures you are not stuck in a lecture theatre or lab throughout first and second year. The hospitals, where clinical attachments take place, are all in the West London area and are very commutable. London is an amazing city to experience as a student with something for everyone. Nikhil Patel, Final year medical student

  4. 4. Tips on getting in

    Work hard and ensure your academic record is strong. Be up to date with current medical developments and have an opinion about topical issues rather than just being able to regurgitate facts. Imperial College are looking for someone that is trainable and an enthusiastic mind with a thirst for the future development of medicine. Dr Irum Sunderji

    As with any medical school application, I would recommend having a well-rounded personal statement and reference; ensure that you have evidence of being both a team player and a leader. Some evidence of long term commitment to an extra-curricular activity or voluntary work is always impressive. Furthermore, it goes without saying that you should play to your strengths so if there is something that you do which is particularly unique or interesting, definitely draw attention to it both in the personal statement and at interview because it will make you stand out from other applicants.

    At interview, the panel are trying to see if you would be the kind of student they would like to teach or have on their team during clinical attachments. Coming across as approachable, polite and friendly is a must. Do not forget to smile and be enthusiastic when talking about studying medicine or any experiences you want to draw upon when asked.

    Imperial uses the BMAT as a way of filtering candidates and it goes without saying that a strong performance in that particular exam is only going to help you get in (check their website for further information on minimum scores required). Nikhil Patel, Final year medical student