University: King’s College London
University: King’s College London

King’s College London was founded in 1828, and together with University College London, formed the two founding colleges of the University of London. Medical students at King’s have access to clinical attachments in three of the most renowned, and busiest teaching hospitals in the UK – Guy’s Hospital, St Thomas’ Hospital and King’s College Hospital. King’s has an excellent reputation for its clinical research, particularly through the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, and a variety of intercalated degrees are offered, with options for experimental research projects. It is also possible to intercalate in a Humanities subject, such as the History of Medicine. Some of the student selected components offered also allow you to add non-medical strings to your bow, such as learning a modern language. The King’s 5-year undergraduate medical programme is divided into three stages, the first looking at the foundations of science related to Medicine, as well as introducing clinical skills. The following two stages have a greater emphasis on clinical practice. Teaching is via lectures, tutorials, facilitated dissection, peer learning and e-learning. King’s College London also offers a 6-year extended medical degree programme for students from non-selective state schools in the Greater London area, which spends two years on the first stage of the course (the science behind Medicine), rather than one year. Graduates can apply to the 5-year undergraduate course, or a 4-year fast-track graduate programme. Teaching on this programme is initially delivered through lectures, case-based workshops, practicals and dissections. This is supplemented by small group tutorials, patient contact learning and communication and clinical skills in small groups. The later years have an emphasis on intensive patient contact. All medical programmes involve an elective, a Foundation assistantship in preparation for working as an F1 doctor, and there are opportunities to take clinical rotations abroad, as King’s has links with many prestigious institutions across the world. Amongst King’s alumni are: the renowned surgeon, Lord Lister, who significantly reduced post-operative mortality by introducing antiseptic sterilisation of instruments into surgery; Florence Nightingale, who founded what is now the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery at King’s; and many others, including Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin, whose work with X-ray diffraction techniques enabled Watson and Crick to work out the structure of DNA.

University: King’s College London

Undergraduate Applicants

  • Minimum Admission Criteria
  • No. of places
  • Degree
  • GCSEs
  • A levels
  • Exam
  • Interview
  • Work experience
  • 5-year programme
  • 360
  • N/A
  • B Maths + English
  • A*AA
  • UKCAT
  • MMI
  • Highly desirable
  • 6-year programme
  • 50
  • N/A
  • B Maths + English
  • ABB-AAA
  • UKCAT
  • MMI
  • Highly desirable

Graduate Applicants

  • Minimum Admission Criteria
  • No. of places
  • Degree
  • GCSEs
  • A levels
  • Exam
  • Interview
  • Work experience
  • 4-year programme
  • 28
  • 2:1/(2:2 + Master’s Merit)
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • UKCAT
  • MMI
  • Highly desirable
  • 5-year programme
  • 360
  • 2:1/(2:2 + Master’s Merit)
  • B Maths + English
  • BB in Chem + Bio
  • UKCAT
  • MMI
  • Highly desirable

There is a 5-year programme for undergraduates with an optional intercalated degree in a wide range of subjects. Most intercalated degrees are Bachelor’s degrees, but some students have taken more time out to complete their MSc, with permission of the Dean.

There is also a 6-year programme for undergraduates from non-selective state schools in Greater London, known as the Extended Medical Degree Programme, which, as part of the widening participation initiative, allows applications from students who may not have achieved the usual A level grades for admission to the 5-year programme.

A/AS levels and GCSEs

For the 5-year programme, the typical offer is A*AA at A level, to include Biology and Chemistry. If only one of Biology or Chemistry is taken to A level, the other must be offered at AS level grade A. General Studies, Thinking Skills, Global Perspectives, and Critical Thinking are usually not accepted, but may be taken into consideration if a candidate has just fallen short of their conditional offer grades. Applicants must have a minimum of grade B in GCSE English and Mathematics, if these subjects were not taken further.

For the 6-year programme, at least one of Biology and Chemistry must be taken to A level, and the other to at least AS level. Offers will be made in the range of ABB to AAA and will take into account the candidate’s predicted/achieved grades and the school or college where these are achieved. General Studies, Thinking Skills, Global Perspectives, and Critical Thinking are usually not accepted, but may be taken into consideration if a candidate has just fallen short of their conditional offer grades. Applicants must have a minimum of grade B in GCSE English and Mathematics, if these subjects were not taken further.

IB

For the 5-year programme, applicants should have at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 7,6,6 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7). Note the total point score of 35 includes Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSEs, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL)

For the 6-year programme, a typical offer is 35 points overall and 666 in three Higher Level subjects, including Chemistry and Biology. However, if applicants are performing exceptionally well within their school/college and receive a good UKCAT score the university may consider predicted or achieved grades at a lower level (to a minimum of 33 points and 655 HL). Grade 5 Standard Level is required in both English and Mathematics, if not offered at GCSE.

Admissions Exam

The UKCAT is required for all applicants. The test is only valid for one year.

Access to Medicine courses

For the 5-year programme, QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 39 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit.

For the 6-year programme, QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit. Also appropriate amount of Level 3 Chemistry and Biology.

Students are encouraged to contact the admissions office if they are considering enrolling in or applying with an Access to Medicine course.

Other Diplomas (inc. BTEC)

For the 5-year programme, the Cambridge Pre-U is accepted with three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology. Grade B in both English and Mathematics are also required.

BTEC diplomas are not considered.

Widening Participation

The university offers a 6-year programme for undergraduates from non-selective state schools in Greater London, known as the Extended Medical Degree Programme, which, as part of the widening participation initiative, allows applications from students who may not have achieved the usual A level grades for admission to the 5-year programme. Applicants must be studying A Levels or Access to Medicine courses at a non-selective in Greater London or are participants of Realising Opportunities across England. Those undertaking the 6-year programme are able to opt-out of the intercalated degree if they wish. The whole programme therefore lasts for 6-7 years, allowing students to study at the first stage at a slower pace. This first stage is known as Foundations of Medicine and is spent learning about biomedical and population sciences, allowing students to build a strong foundation for future study.

International Students

There are approximately 30 places for non-UK/EU students on the 5-year programme. The 6-year programme is not open to international applicants.

To ensure that you have the right proof of English Language competency to study Medicine at King’s, please see the following webpage:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/apply/entry-requirements/english-language.aspx

If you are applying as an overseas student and taken qualifications other than those listed above, please contact us by email (enquiries@themsag.com) if you would like more information on the minimum grades needed to be considered for a place in Medicine at King’s.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Applications via UCAS for 2018/19 entry for both undergraduate programmes are open from 6th September 2017 and close on 15th October 2017.

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS

  • Completed UCAS application form
  • Secondary education certificates/transcripts may be requested

SELECTION PROCESS

To be interviewed for admission to the 5-year programme, academic achievement, personal statements, reference letters and UKCAT scores are all taken into account. Note that there is no formal UKCAT cut-off score. UKCAT scores will be considered during selection for the interview, however they will not be the sole indicator for selection. Students who have done very well at GCSE (10-11A*) have a chance of gaining an interview, even with a mediocre UKCAT score, provided their personal statement and reference letter are also evaluated favourably. A favourable personal statement would show evidence of active involvement in school life and the wider community, a commitment to and realistic understanding of Medicine, and good communication and team-working skills. King’s expect applications to be strongly supported by the applicant’s referees, both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of character and suitability for medicine. After the interview, offers are based almost entirely on the interview performance. Note that the university states it is “very desirable” for applicants to have work shadowing or observation in a medical clinical setting, as well as voluntary or paid work experience, particularly in settings where they can interact with the general public.

For the 6-year programme, the UKCAT is used contextually; test results are considered along with other factors, including where the applicant has been to school. However a low score in the UKCAT may substantially reduce your chances of being invited to interview. As with the 5-year programme, all parts of the application, including academic achievement, personal statement and references are also considered in determining which students to invite for interview.

INTERVIEW

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. One station is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some station scenarios are science-based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills. Others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues, and the candidate’s ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

Each year, approximately 4500 candidates apply for 410 spaces on the undergraduate programmes in total. Note that around 1200-1400 interviews take place.

For the 6-year programme, there are normally approximately 400 applicants for 50 spaces on the course.

Medicine at King’s College London is ranked 31st in the UK by the Guardian University Guide 2018.

It is ranked 27th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2018.

It is among the top 21 medical schools in the QS World University Rankings.

Graduates can apply to both a 5-year programme, with undergraduates and a fast-track graduate-only 4-year programme.

Note that applicants can apply to either or both courses via UCAS. If a candidate only applies to the 4-year programme and they reach interview stage, they will automatically be considered for the 5-year programme also. However, if they do not reach interview stage, they will not be considered for the 5-year programme, unless they have applied to this as well.

Degree and A levels

For the 5-year programme, graduates should normally have at least a 2:1 degree. However, a 2:2 is acceptable if a Master’s degree (pass with merit) is also offered. Usually A level Biology and Chemistry are also required, at grade B or above. If the applicant’s degree has a sufficient quantity of these two subjects, this requirement can be waived.

Applicants to the 4-year programme, should have at least a 2:1 in a degree subject specifically within biosciences. Again, a 2:2 plus a Master’s with at least a merit, in a science discipline can be considered. There are no A level requirements for this course, except for the following: students with nursing degrees, or degrees from other allied health professionals are eligible, will need A level Chemistry (unless the degree was more than 50% Chemistry-based).

GCSEs

Applicants to the 5-year programme must have a minimum of grade B in GCSE English and Mathematics, if these subjects were not taken further.

There are no GCSE requirements for the 4-year programme

Admissions Exam

The UKCAT is required for all applicants. The test is only valid for one year.

Other Diplomas

A pass in a Diploma of Higher Education in Nursing, with at least two years' nursing work experience and A Level Chemistry at grade A can meet the academic requirements for the 4-year programme.

International Students

International graduates may apply to either course. The government quota on international students is 8% of the total (i.e. roughly 28-30 international students for the 5-year programme, and roughly 3 for the 4-year programme).

If English is not your first language, it is advisable to check the following webpage to ensure you have the appropriate evidence of competency:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/apply/entry-requirements/english-language.aspx

If you are applying as an overseas student and taken qualifications other than those listed above, please contact us by email (enquiries@themsag.com) if you would like more information on the minimum grades needed to be considered for a place in Medicine at King’s.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Applications via UCAS for 2018/19 entry for both programmes are open from 6th September 2017 and close on 15th October 2017.

Application Documents

  • Completed UCAS application form
  • Degree transcripts and secondary education certificates may be requested

SELECTION PROCESS

To be interviewed for admission to the 5-year programme, academic achievement, personal statements, reference letters and UKCAT scores are all taken into account. Note that there is no formal UKCAT cut-off score. UKCAT scores will be considered during selection for the interview, however they will not be the sole indicator for selection. Students who have done very well academically have a chance of gaining an interview, even with a mediocre UKCAT score, provided their personal statement and reference letter are also evaluated favourably. A favourable personal statement would show evidence of active involvement in school life and the wider community, a commitment to and realistic understanding of Medicine, and good communication and team-working skills. King’s expects applications to be strongly supported by the applicant’s referees, both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of character and suitability for medicine. After the interview, offers are based almost entirely on the interview performance. Note that the university states it is “very desirable” for applicants to have work shadowing or observation in a medical clinical setting, as well as voluntary or paid work experience, particularly in settings where they can interact with the general public.

As for the 5-year programme, work experience is ‘very desirable’.

INTERVIEW

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. One station is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some station scenarios are science-based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills. Others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues, and the candidate’s ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

In the 2016/17 application cycle, there were 1950 school leavers applicants and 821 “other” applicants (most of which are graduates) for the MBBS 5-year course. There were 1272 applicants for the 4-year course.

795 school leavers and 192 “others” (mainly graduates) were interviewed for the 5-year programme and 158 applicants were interviewed for the 4-year programme.

465 school leavers and 132 “other” applicants (mainly graduates) received an offer for the 5-year programme. 43 applicants received an offer for the graduate 4-year programme.

Each year, approximately 4500 candidates apply for 360 spaces on the 5-year programme. Note that around 1200-1400 interviews take place. 20% of students who receive offers for the 5-year programme tend to be graduates.

There are 28 spaces available on the 4-year programme, for which, of the 1600 applicants who apply, 170 are interviewed and 42 will receive offers.

Medicine at King’s College London is ranked 31st in the UK by the Guardian University Guide 2018.

It is ranked 27th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2018.

It is among the top 21 medical schools in the QS World University Rankings.

  1. 1. What are the good things about studying Medicine at this university?

    First couple of terms are reasonably relaxed, lets you settle into uni nicely. They print out all the lecture slides for you and give it to you at the start of the semester. All the material is available online anyway if you want another copy or if you lose it etc. apparently they’ve now started recording the lectures too so you can literally go online and watch an actual video of the lecture (this facility wasn’t running in my first 2 years there but I heard briefly that they recently introduced it so not 100% sure it’s accurate). Lecturers are approachable and willing to help. Tutorials are useful and really help learning. They break topics down into scenarios so for example ‘johns chest pain’ ‘Amy’s asthma’ ‘Caroline’s high BP’ etc. which makes things clear and easier to learn. All end of year exams are MCQ - no essays and short answers so if you don’t like essays then woohoo. People at GKT are chilling. Lots of Asians i.e. Ind pak lankan. Everyone helps each other and shares stuff etc. No extreme competitiveness and all that rubbish! Accommodation - Great Dover Street and Stamford Street is really good and convenient. Dissection is really good: start in first semester of first term and finish in 2nd semester of 2nd term, although there’s more prosection in 2nd year with limbs and head and neck - everyone gets a chance to do some real dissecting, and see a lot. Demonstrators are really good too. In general, the anatomy depth is awesome. Clinical skills facilities are good as well. Whole room - independent learning room just been renovated - dedicated year round for OSCE practice for all years. Guy’s campus is nice! being in London is incredible with all the stuff to do etc. easy transport links.

  2. 2. What is not so good about studying Medicine there?

    SSC (Student selected components) allocation isn’t great. There are really limited topics and all of them have to be done by someone. Sometimes people get given their 14/15th choice so it’s a topic, which you have absolutely no interest in at all! (They ask you to choose 6 and then another 6 and then another 6 etc. until you actually get allocated one. They say allocation is done by computer algorithm and first come first serve but it’s not true. It’s not done by your grade either so it’s all just messed up. Library is relatively small, gets packed quickly during exam time. It’s only 24 hours during exam time too (imperial is 24/7 all year round?). Because exams are all MCQs you don’t get the answers - so you don’t know what you got right or wrong - can’t learn from mistakes. Clinics years, you can get sent out far! e.g. Margate on the SE coast of UK. trek! London is expensive! Don’t start proper clinical skills till MBBS3. In the first 2 years, it’s all communication stuff, dealing with blind and deaf, do a few things like BP, subcut and urine dipstick but that’s it.

  3. 3. What advice do you have for someone thinking of studying Medicine there?

    I really enjoy studying here, location is good, people are good and facilities are sufficient (I can compare to imperial and yours are much better! but it’s a luxury to have). Really high standards but without the competitiveness of other unis so make your choice depending on your own personality.