University of Leicester
University of Leicester

The medical school in the University of Leicester, founded in 1975, prides itself in being up to date with current technology. It has recently enjoyed a number of refurbishments, including the £42 million New Centre for Medicine Building with state of the art facilities. Teaching at the medical school has also been recently changed – the curriculum has been redesigned in order to emphasise patient centred care and is complemented by early clinical exposure. New first year medical students will also be given an iPad for free, in order to access e-learning which supplements the content delivered through lectures.

Despite this, there are still some traditions which the university holds to - Leicester remains one of the few medical schools left which continues to offer full body dissection of cadavers for anatomy teaching. Teaching is mainly delivered through problem-based learning in the smallest teaching clinical groups in the UK. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an intercalated BSc, thereby increasing their degree length to 6 years.

University of Leicester

Undergraduate Applicants

  • Minimum Admission Criteria
  • No. of places
  • Degree
  • A levels
  • GCSEs
  • Admission Exam
  • Interview
  • Work experience
  • Undergraduate Applicant
  • 241 places available – 224 UK/EU students and 17 International students
  • N/A
  • AAA including Chemistry
  • At least Grade C in: English Language, Maths and Sciences
  • UKCAT
  • MMI format
  • Essential

Graduate Applicants

  • Minimum Admission Criteria
  • No. of places
  • Degree
  • A levels
  • GCSEs
  • Admission Exam
  • Interview
  • Work experience
  • Graduate Applicant
  • 241 places available – 224 UK/EU students and 17 International students
  • At least 2:1 from any discipline
  • A levels will be taken into account in order to generate an academic score
  • At least Grade C in: English Language and Maths, At least Grade B in two Science GCSEs
  • UKCAT
  • MMI format
  • Essential

All students will follow the A100 5-year programme which consists of 4 phases. Phase 1 lasts for two years and involves following an integrated curriculum with a focus on the structure and function of the body in both health and disease states. During this time, students also attend community placements and have the opportunity to explore areas of interest in Medicine through a number of ‘Student Selected Components’. Teaching during this period is delivered through a mix of lectures, clinical teaching and group work. Group work is in the form of problem-based learning where students work together to solve problems related to clinical cases. Anatomy teaching is delivered through the use of full body dissection where there are small groups assigned to a cadaver.

In the following phases, students spend a large majority of their time in clinical environments rotating through various clinical placements. These range from General Medicine and Surgery to more specialised areas such as Psychiatry and Paediatrics. Students will also experience varying clinical environments; from smaller community attachments, to large hospitals in Leicester, Northampton and Lincoln.

Intercalated BSc

Students can spend an extra year studying towards an Intercalated BSc (iBSc) after the second or third year of the course.

The following requirements apply for candidates applying to either the 5-year course in London or in Malta.

A/AS levels and GCSEs

Applicants are required to be predicted AAA in 3 A level subjects including Chemistry and Biology (or Human Biology). If Biology is taken at AS, it does not need to be taken at A level as well. General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted. Mathematics and Further Mathematics count as one subject for the purposes of the A level requirements, and therefore only one of these subjects will be scored.

A fourth AS or Extended Project Qualification is not required, however in some cases it may be used in a tie-break situation, where it may act in a candidate’s favour.

GCSE:

English Language, Mathematics and two Sciences (including Chemistry or Double Science) must be all achieved at Grade C. Note that the GCSE grades required for selection to interview will likely be higher than this due to competition from other applicants (please see ‘Selection Process’ below).

IB

Pupils must pass the Diploma with 36 points including Chemistry and Biology at Higher Level. Grade 6 is required in all subjects.

Admissions Exam

All applicants are required to sit the UKCAT, which is valid for 1 year. The UKCAT can be sat between July and October.

Access to Medicine courses

Applicants may apply with an Access to Medicine qualification from the following institutions:

  • City & Islington College
  • Glasgow Kelvin College
  • Lambeth College
  • The Manchester College
  • Stafford College/New College Telford
  • Sussex Downs College
  • College of West Anglia

Note that courses will not be accepted if the candidate has poor grades in science A Levels, except in mitigating circumstances. Access courses however will be accepted from candidates who are re-entering education from another career or have taken non-science A levels. If candidates have a prior degree, they will be scored as graduates.

Applicants must achieve an overall distinction with 45 Level 3 Credits at Distinction as well as the GCSE requirement (English Language, Mathematics and two Sciences all at least Grade C). They must also submit a full CV with details of:

  • Previous schooling and educational achievements
  • All previous work experience
  • Details of any gaps in education or employment

Access candidates will have their academic qualifications, UKCAT results, references and personal statement scored. They will be considered as a separate group when selecting for interview.

Other Diplomas

A single Level 3 BTEC Subsidiary Diploma or National Award will be considered, in combination with Biology and Chemistry A Levels (AA).

Widening Participation

Applicants who have completed a Realising Opportunities (ROP) or Leicester Enhanced Access (LEAP) programme may be given an alternative offer of ABB at A-Level.

Leicester Medical School also runs a widening participation outreach scheme known as Medreach. Medreach offers workshops and an e-mentoring scheme for those who wish study medicine and health related professions.

International Students

No of % places: 17
English Language Requirements:

Applicants must achieve 7.5 overall in the IELTS with no component below 7.0. If taking TOEFL, applicants must have an overall score of 110 (with a minimum of 24 in each component).

The university expects to interview approximately 40 international applicants for 17 places.

If you are applying as an overseas student and taken qualifications other than those listed above, please contact us by email (enquiries@themsag.com) if you would like more information on the minimum grades needed to be considered for a place at Leicester Medical School.

Policy on Re-applicants

The university will consider re-applicants.

Policy on Deferrals

The university allows candidates to apply for deferred entry.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Applications are via UCAS. For 2018/2019 entry, applications open from 1st September 2017 and close on 15th October 2017.

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS

  • Completed UCAS application form
  • Those applying with Access courses should send the admissions team a copy of their CV, to detail in particular previous schooling and educational achievements, as well as details on their work experience.

SELECTION PROCESS

Applicants will be assigned a score based on their academic achievements and UKCAT score. Applicants are then ranked with the highest scoring candidates being invited for interview.

The academic score is based on the UCAS form and up to 32 points are available.

  • If applicants have predicted A levels – 8 GCSE qualifications will be scored. This may be English language, maths, double science (2) and the best other 4 subjects OR it will be English Language, Maths, Chemistry, Biology and the best other 4 subjects.
    • GCSE scores: A*=4, A=3, B=1, C=0
  • If applicants have already achieved A levels – 5 GCSE qualifications and the best 3 A Levels over the same 2 year period will be scored. The scored GCSEs may be English Language, Maths, Double science, and the best other subject OR it will be English language, Maths, Chemistry, Biology and the best other subject. The best 3 A level scored include Chemistry but exclude Critical Thinking, Citizenship Studies and General Studies. Only one of Maths or further Maths can be scored.
    • A level scoring: A* = 5, A =4
    • GCSE scoring: A* = 4, A=3, B = 1 , C=0

Although the total possible academic score is 35, the maximum score awarded will be of 32.

  • Applicants who have achieved the IB, will have 5 GCSE qualifications scored and the best 3 Higher Level grades. The scored GCSEs may be English Language, Maths, Double science, and the best other subject OR it will be English language, Maths, Chemistry, Biology and the best other subject.
    • Higher Level scoring: 7 points = 5, 6 points = 4
    • GCSE scoring: A* = 4, A=3, B = 1 , C=0

In the GCSE scoring, English, Mathematics, Chemistry and Biology (or Double Science) are always scored, and for the remainder, the candidate’s grades in their best remaining subjects are scored.

The academic score will then be combined with a score (up to 32 points) based on the UKCAT results. The UKCAT will be scored as follows:

>3,200 = 32
3150 – 3199 = 31.5
3100 – 3149 = 31
3050 – 3099 = 30.5
3000 – 3049 = 30
2950 – 2999 = 29.5
2900 – 2949 = 29 etc

The maximum possible score is therefore 64. This combined score is used to determine which applicants will be invited for interview. In some borderline cases, the personal statement and reference may also be used in conjunction with the scores. Qualities that the admissions team will look for in the personal statement are as follows:

  • Motivation
  • Commitment
  • Appreciation of challenges of a medical career
  • Work experience
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Contribution to school/college life
  • Contribution to wider community
  • Written communication skills
  • Support from teachers/staff
  • Confirmation of some aspects of personal statement in reference

For 2016/2017 entry, the minimum score required to be invited to interview for home/EU candidates was 56.5/68 and for overseas applicants was 57.5.

INTERVIEW

The interview at Leicester will follow the multiple mini interview (MMI) format which will consist of 8-9 stations which may be manned or. During the interview, the following attributes will be assessed:

  • Communication – both written and verbal
  • Motivation and suitability
  • Listening
  • Problem solving
  • Personal qualities and values
  • Motivation and suitability

Each station will be scored and applicants will subsequently be ranked before a decision to offer is made. In the event of a tie between applicants following interview, the score for the UCAS form may be used.

For 2017/2018 entry, the minimum score required to be invited for interview for non-graduate home/EU applicants was 39.5/48 for those who had achieved A levels and 40.5/48 for those with predicted A levels. Overseas non graduate applicants required a score of 39.5/48 in order to be invited for interview.

The interview score required to be made an offer was 116/162 for Home/EU applicants and 93/162 for overseas applicants.

There are 241 places available on the 5-year programme, with 224 of the places for UK/EU students and the remaining 17 places for international students.

For 2017/18 entry:

  • There were 1401 Home/EU non graduate applicants of which 785 were interviewed and 469 offers were made.
  • There were 139 overseas non graduate applicants of which 40 were interviewed and 26 offers were made.

In the Guardian University Guide 2018 – Medicine at the University of Leicester ranks 28th.

In the Complete University Guide 2018 – Medicine at the University of Leicester ranks 28th.

In the QS World University Rankings 2017, the University of Leicester is amongst the top 150-101 for medicine.

Leicester medical school does not offer a separate graduate entry programme. However, graduates from all disciplines are also welcome to apply for the A100 5-year programme, which consists of 4 phases. Phase 1 lasts for two years and involves following an integrated curriculum with a focus on the structure and function of the body in both health and disease states. During this time, students also attend community placements and have the opportunity to explore areas of interest in Medicine through a number of ‘Student Selected Components’. Teaching during this period is delivered through a mix of lectures, clinical teaching and group work. Group work is in the form of problem-based learning where students work together to solve problems related to clinical cases. Anatomy teaching is delivered through the use of full body dissection where there are small groups assigned to a cadaver.

In the following phases, students spend a large majority of their time in clinical environments rotating through various clinical placements. These range from General Medicine and Surgery to more specialised areas such as Psychiatry and Paediatrics. Students will also experience varying clinical environments; from smaller community attachments, to large hospitals in Leicester, Northampton and Lincoln.

Intercalated BSc:

Students can spend an extra year studying towards an Intercalated BSc (iBSc) after the second or third year of the course.

Degree

Applicants must hold (or be predicted if applying in a final year of an undergraduate course) at least a 2:1 Honours Degree in their first degree which can be from any discipline. A subsequent postgraduate degree, such as a Master’s degree or PhD, will not alter the initial undergraduate degree requirement.

A/AS levels and GCSEs

Applicants must have achieved a Grade C in GCSE English Language and Mathematics, and a Grade B in two GCSE Science subjects (Chemistry, Biology, Physics or Double Science). Note that A levels will be scored as part of the selection process (see below), but the only minimum stipulation is that subjects such as General Studies and Critical Thinking will not be considered.

Admissions Exam

All applicants are required to sit the UKCAT, which is valid for 1 year. The UKCAT can be sat between July and October.

Access to Medicine courses

Graduates may wish to apply using an Access to Medicine course, if they do not come from a scientific education background, however it should be noted that this will not compensate for poor A level results, regardless of subject. Unlike undergraduates who apply with Access courses, graduates with Access courses will not be considered separately and will be scored based on their GCSEs/A levels or equivalent. Applicants may apply with an Access to Medicine qualification from the following institutions:

  • City & Islington College
  • Glasgow Kelvin College
  • Lambeth College
  • The Manchester College
  • Stafford College/New College Telford
  • Sussex Downs College
  • College of West Anglia
International Students

No of % places: 17
English Language Requirements:

Applicants must achieve 7.5 overall in the IELTS with no component below 7.0. If taking TOEFL, applicants must have an overall score of 110 (with a minimum of 24 in each component).

The university expects to interview approximately 40 international applicants for 17 places.

If you are applying as an overseas student and taken qualifications other than those listed above, please contact us by email (enquiries@themsag.com) if you would like more information on the minimum grades needed to be considered for a place at Leicester Medical School.

Policy on Re-applicants

The university will consider re-applicants.

Policy on Deferrals:

The university will not consider deferred entry from graduate entry applicants. If a graduate is made an offer but wishes to defer, the university would instead consider their application for entry the following year. If the applicant’s academic and UKCAT score remained competitive, they would be made another offer without the need for a repeat interview.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Applications are via UCAS. For 2018/2019 entry, applications open from 1st September 2017 and close on 15th October 2017.

Application Documents

  • Completed UCAS application form
  • Graduates who have degrees which are not classified in the same way as UK honours degrees should send their degree transcripts to the university admissions team, ideally prior to applying, so that the admissions team can check degree equivalency through NARIC.

SELECTION PROCESS

Academic ability and UKCAT will each be scored out of 32, giving a total score out of 64. For most applicants academic ability will be based on GCSE and A-level grades, with a contribution from the degree.

For applicants who have taken qualifications other than GCSE and A-levels, an assessment of equivalence will be made. For applicants who are offering a degree that is not classified in the same way as the UK honours classification, transcripts will be required and an assessment of equivalence will be made. We may ask you to provide us with transcripts of your qualifications, in order for us to assess the UK equivalence through NARIC. It may help to speed up the processing of your application if you provide the transcripts prior to applying.

16 points out of the maximum total of 32 points will derive from GCSEs: 4 GCSEs will be scored - English Language, Maths, and two Sciences.

  • GCSE scoring: A* = 4, A=3, B = 1 , C=0

12 points out of the maximum total of 32 points will derive from A Levels: 3 best A Levels, excluding General Studies, Citizenship Studies and Critical Thinking.

  • A level scoring: A*/A = 4 (Or 3 if taken over 3 year period), B =3 (or 2 if taken over a 3 year period) and C=1 (or 0 if taken over a 3 year period)

4 points out of the maximum total of 32 points, will derive from the degree prediction or classification

  • First class obtained = 4 , first class predicted = 3, 2:1 obtained = 3 and 2:1 predicted =1

The academic score will then be combined with a score (up to 32 points) based on the UKCAT results. The UKCAT will be scored as follows:

>3,200 = 32
3150 – 3199 = 31.5
3100 – 3149 = 31
3050 – 3099 = 30.5
3000 – 3049 = 30
2950 – 2999 = 29.5
2900 – 2949 = 29 etc

The maximum possible score is therefore 64. This combined score is used to determine which applicants will be invited for interview.

The personal statement and reference are not routinely scored except for candidates applying with an Access to Medicine qualification. However in borderline candidates or tie-break situations these sections may also be used to generate a combined score out of 10, giving a total score for Personal Qualities. Where appropriate, the Personal Qualities score will be added to the academic and UKCAT score in order to determine the final ranking and selection for interview. The following attributes will be considered:

  • Motivation
  • Commitment
  • Appreciation of challenges of a medical career
  • Work experience
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Contribution to school/college life
  • Contribution to wider community
  • Written communication skills
  • Support from teachers/staff
  • Confirmation of some aspects of personal statement in reference

For 2016/2017 entry, the minimum score required to be invited to interview for home/EU candidates was 56.5/68 and for overseas applicants was 57.5.

INTERVIEW

The interview at Leicester will follow the multiple mini interview (MMI) format which will consist of 8-9 stations which may be manned or. During the interview, the following attributes will be assessed:

  • Communication – both written and verbal
  • Motivation and suitability
  • Listening
  • Problem solving
  • Personal qualities and values
  • Motivation and suitability

Each station will be scored and applicants will subsequently be ranked before a decision to offer is made. In the event of a tie between applicants following interview, the score for the UCAS form may be used.

For 2017/2018 entry, for graduate applicants, the minimum score required for interview was 39.5/48 for Home/EU applicants and 37.5/48 for overseas applicants. An interview score of above 116 was needed for Home/EU applicants in order to be made an offer, and for overseas applicants it was 93 and above.

There are 241 places available on the 5-year programme, with 224 of the places for UK/EU students and the remaining 17 places for international students.

For 2017/18 entry:

  • There were 1401 Home/EU non graduate applicants of which 785 were interviewed and 469 offers were made.

There were 139 overseas non graduate applicants of which 40 were interviewed and 26 offers were made. There were 544 Home/EU graduate applicants of which 176 were interviewed and 111 offers were made.

There were 41 overseas graduate applicants of which 7 were interviewed and 5 offers were made.

In the Guardian University Guide 2018 – Medicine at the University of Leicester ranks 28th.

In the Complete University Guide 2018 – Medicine at the University of Leicester ranks 28th.

In the QS World University Rankings 2017, the University of Leicester is amongst the top 150-101 for medicine.

  1. 1. What are the good things about studying Medicine at this university?

    With fantastic teaching, a strong sense of community and plenty of opportunities for early clinical exposure, the University of Leicester is an excellent place to study Medicine. It has recently built a brand spanking new Medical School, and developed a splendid e-learning system, facilitated through the distribution of free iPads to each student. Leicester really is unarguably embracing a future with technology at its core.

    The course is divided into two main phases. The first mixes classroom/lecture-based teaching with community clinical placements and allows a broad range of educational experiences, and prepares you for wider clinical exposure during placements in Phase 2 of the course. One of the strongest aspects of the curriculum is the organisation of students into small groups of 6-8 people, which form a cohesive unit throughout the first two and a half years of the course and a solid base through which to develop your clinical faculties.

    There are also plenty of opportunities to broaden your education beyond the core medical curriculum through involvement in thriving societies such as Medsin (charity for global/local health issues), Friends of Medecins Sans Frontieres and Sexpression (a charity that empowers young people to make decisions about sex and relationships). These provide opportunities to provide peer-lead teaching, as well as taking part in broader education and advocacy activities.

  2. 2. What is not so good about studying Medicine there?

    Unfortunately, Leicester Medical School places little focus on research opportunities. The lack of central support from the Medical School puts the onus on students to develop their own opportunities, which are available if looked for, but this is an area in which Leicester needs to develop. This also feeds into a lack of focus on preparing students to enter academic foundation programs, which are regarded as more competitive.

    The exam system is also remarkably punitive, with a fail-resit-out system. This leads to promising students being cast-out at an early stage, and little room for adjustment to the examination system. That being said, the Medical School is very supportive of those with mitigating circumstances, and does allow repeat years for those with strong reasons.

    In regard to the curriculum, there is also a gross absence of public health education - something which should be absolutely central to healthcare learning. This may be corrected in upcoming curriculum changes, but is something students should bear in mind.

  3. 3. What advice do you have for someone thinking of studying Medicine there?

    I’ve had a fantastic time at Leicester, and I am sure you would too. The city is big enough for you to see a bit of everything (and have plenty of excellent restaurants) but small enough to not to feel too crazy. Talk to current students, read the Leicester Medical Student blog and check out the Student Union Website to get a feel for the environment. Despite its flaws, I haven’t regretted choosing to study at Leicester for one second.

  4. 4. Do you have any tips on how to get in?

    Develop some specific interests. Read up on the refugee crisis, social inequalities, the nutrition transition - anything that you can talk about in interview and pique the interest of the admissions officer
    Do well in your UKCAT. To do that, practise, practise, practise and then maybe do some more practising.
    Don’t be afraid to take your time. I know so many people in their mid-twenties/early thirties who came to Medicine after pursuing other routes and, in my experience, they are usually the most passionate about the subject. Do not be afraid of exploring other interests before committing to a career in Medicine!