Medical School Application Guide

 

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry

 
Barts has an international reputation for excellence in research in the following fields: Cancer, cardiovascular disease, inflammation, endocrinology/metabolism, immunology and infectious diseases, genomics, neuroscience, gastroenterology, epidemiology and primary care. It is part of the Queen Mary University of London and was founded in 1995 through the amalgamation of the London Hospital Medical College and the Medical College of St Bartholomew’s Hospital (currently the oldest hospital in the UK). Famous alumni include William Harvey (formulated and proved the theory that blood circulates around the body) and James Parkinson (eponymous discoverer of Parkinson’s disease). The medical course structure is integrated, with elements of problem-based learning to encourage independent thinking.

King’s College London

 

 

Barts has an international reputation for excellence in research in the following fields: Cancer, cardiovascular disease, inflammation, endocrinology/metabolism, immunology and infectious diseases, genomics, neuroscience, gastroenterology, epidemiology and primary care. It is part of the Queen Mary University of London and was founded in 1995 through the amalgamation of the London Hospital Medical College and the Medical College of St Bartholomew’s Hospital (currently the oldest hospital in the UK). Famous alumni include William Harvey (formulated and proved the theory that blood circulates around the body) and James Parkinson (eponymous discoverer of Parkinson’s disease). The medical course structure is integrated, with elements of problem-based learning to encourage independent thinking.

 

The first two years are devoted to systems of the body, and mechanisms of disease, while the last three years are primarily reserved for clinical attachments. The central London campus includes modern, state-of-the-art buildings as well as beautiful traditional structures, such as the Whitechapel Library, a former church. There is early patient contact on the course and the wide catchment area, encompassing both East London and the City of London, means that there is a large diversity of patients and conditions. The medical school scored 96% in overall satisfaction in the National Student Survey in 2015.

 

Barts also offers a medical degree course in Malta, where students can also complete their Foundation doctor training. Students at Barts will have the opportunity to do an intercalated degree, and as part of their training they will complete thirteen student selected components, which enables them to explore, in depth, particular areas of Medicine which interest them. They will shadow an FY1 doctor as part of their final year, as well as completing a medical elective (which can be in the UK or abroad).

 

The Medical School Application Guide

At a Glance

Courses available

4 to 6-year programme

  Undergraduate Applicants Graduate Applicants
  5-year 6-year 4-year 5-year
No. of places 253   39 253
Degree N/A N/A 2:1* 2:1
GCSEs AAABBB C in English + Maths None None
A levels AAAb AAB-BBB B in Bio + Chem B in Bio + Chem
Exam UKCAT UKCAT UKCAT UKCAT
Interview Panel Panel Panel + activities Panel
Work experience Highly important Highly important Highly important Highly important
*In Science/Healthcare
   

 

 

PROGRAMMES

 

Undergraduate applicants can apply to a 5-year programme with the option to take an intercalated degree after their 2nd, 3rd or 4th year. There are a wide range of degree options to choose from, including Molecular Medicine, Sports and Exercise Medicine and Medical Education.

 

There is also a 6-year programme available for school leavers residing in the East London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets, Newham, Barking & Dagenham, Hackney and Havering, Waltham Forest, which includes an initial year of study, based at Newham University Hospital, where students undergo placements in a variety of medical subjects, as well as attending problem-based learning sessions with the first year students on the 5-year programme. Successful completion of this year guarantees entrance to the 5-year programme.

 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS AND ELIGIBILITY

 

A/AS levels and GCSEs

 

For the 5-year programme, the typical offer is AAAb with Chemistry or Biology to A level with at least one other science/Maths subject (Chemistry, Biology, Physics, or Mathematics). The third A level can be in any subject, bar Critical Thinking and General Studies. Note that Chemistry and Biology must both be offered at AS level to a minimum of grade B. If Mathematics and Further Mathematics are offered in the same sitting, Further Mathematics will only be accepted to AS level.

 

For those offering 4 A levels (two science and two non-science subjects), the normal offer is AAAC (A grades are required in two science subjects one of which must be Biology or Chemistry). All four subjects must be pursued to A2 level and no AS-levels should have been cashed in.

 

Note that Barts does not normally accept A level re-sits after the normal 2 year period in which most candidates take these exams. The only exception to this rule is if the candidate is protected under the Equality and Diversity Act of 2010, in which case they should contact the medical school by the 1st September in the year of application, to ensure the school is aware. Re-sits during the two year period are acceptable.

 

The minimum GCSE grades are AAABBB to include Biology/Human Biology, Chemistry, English and Mathematics (in any order). Double award science can be substituted for Biology and Chemistry.

 

For entry to the 6-year programme, A level grade offers will be in the range of AAB-BBB depending on the contextual data from the candidate’s educational and socio-economic background. The minimum GCSE requirements are grades C in English and Mathematics. The same A level subject criteria applies, as for the 5-year programme. For further details about how to apply to this course, see below (under Widening Participation).

 

IB

 

38 points are required in total with 6,6,6 at Higher Level. Higher Level subjects should include Chemistry or Biology and one other science/Mathematics subject. Standard level subjects should include Biology or Chemistry, if not offered at Higher Level. If English is not part of the IB, it should be offered to GCSE at grade B or above.

 

Admissions Exam

 

The UKCAT is required for all applicants to the 5-year programme and 6-year programme. The test is only valid for one year. Candidates must score above the third decile as a minimum.

 

Access to Medicine courses

 

Not accepted.

 

Other Diplomas (inc. BTEC)

 

The Cambridge Pre-U is accepted, with three subjects to grade D3 or above, to include Biology and/or Chemistry. A second science is required if only one of these is offered. An additional short course is required at grade M2. If you are taking a combination of Pre-U and A-level subjects you should contact the medicine admissions team for advice on the grades you will be required to achieve. The GCSE requirements are the same as above.

 

The BTEC is not accepted, though it does count towards your UCAS tariff points, which contribute to your likelihood of being selected for interview (see below).

 

Widening Participation

 

The 6-year programme, known as the Barts Health Scheme (formerly the Newham Doc Scheme), is offered to students from the London boroughs listed above, who are unlikely to obtain the usual A level entry requirements for the 5-year programme. The applicant must be nominated by one of their teachers, who feels that they would be suited to studying Medicine. If you think that you might be eligible for this programme, speak to your teachers, who can contact the Student Recruitment and Admissions Office: smdadmissions@qmul.ac.uk on your behalf.

 

International Students

 

International students can apply to the 5-year programme. There are usually about 24 spaces for international students in total across the medical school (this includes applicants to the 4-year graduate programme). English Language requirements may be met by English Language GCSE at grade B or an IELTS score of 7.0 overall (sat within the last 2 years).

 

If you are applying as an overseas student and taken qualifications other than those listed above, please contact us by email (enquiries@themsag.com) if you would like more information on the minimum grades needed to be considered for a place in Medicine at Barts.

 

Policy on Re-applicants

 

There are no restrictions on re-applying to Bart’s.

 

Policy on Deferrals

 

Applications for deferred entry are welcomed at the time of the UCAS submission, though the university would expect that you would be able to tell them at interview how you plan to use your gap year constructively. It may not be possible to defer later in the application process.

 

APPLICATION PROCESS

 

Application Deadlines

 

Applications via UCAS for 2017/18 entry are open from 1st September 2016 and close on 15th October 2016

 

Application Documents

 

• Completed UCAS application form

 

SELECTION PROCESS AND INTERVIEW

 

Selection Process

 

The admissions team initially reviews all applications to ensure candidates meet the minimum grades required. Selection for interview is then based on allocating points to the candidate’s UKCAT score and their UCAS tariff points. The weighting is 50% for each, so candidates with lower UCAS tariff scores can compensate with a higher UKCAT score and vice versa. The minimum UCAS tariff score is 410 (note that this is calculated on the basis of the academic grades you have listed on your UCAS form, as well as any non-academic qualifications such as music exams – this link will show you what counts as ‘tariffable’ qualifications: http://www.ucas.com/students/ucas_tariff/). The minimum UKCAT score is 2400 (candidates scoring below the third decile will not be selected for interview). Note that in 2015, the candidate with the lowest tariff points to receive an offer (430), compensated with a UKCAT score of 3020. The candidate with the lowest UKCAT score to receive an offer (2400) had a tariff score of 830. Note that cut-off scores will vary each year, as the pool of applicants changes. The medical school emphasises the high importance of work and voluntary experience. Although not having this will not prevent you from getting to the interview stage; it is inevitable that questions about your work experience will be asked at interview. Once selected for interview, offers are based primarily on your performance at the interview stage, however the Situational Judgement section from your UKCAT exam may be assessed during your interview.

 

Interview

 

Interviews are conducted by a panel of 2 academic/clinical members of staff, a medical student and sometimes a lay person. The interviewers are looking for you to demonstrate the following:

 

• Motivation and realistic approach to Medicine as a career

• Show initiative, resilience and maturity

• Work well as part of a team

• Be well organised and demonstrate problem solving abilities

• Likely contribution to university life

• Communicate effectively in a wide range of situations

 

Your personal statement is not scored but you can use it during your interview to show supporting evidence of the above criteria. Barts are looking for medical students who will not only participate academically, but also enthusiastically in university life and in the local community. Note that the Situational Judgement section from your UKCAT exam may be used as part of the interview assessment.

 

There are opportunities to be interviewed in London, Hong Kong and Singapore.

 

COMPETITION RATIOS

 

For entry to the 5-year programme in 2016, Barts received over 2300 applications, interviewed 996 candidates and made 500 offers for the 253 spaces available.

 

RANKINGS

 

Medicine at Barts and the London is ranked 5th in the UK by the Guardian University Guide 2016.

 

It is ranked 6th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2016.

 

It is among the top 100 medical schools in the QS World University Rankings.

 

PROGRAMMES

 

Graduates can apply to the 5-year programme along with undergraduate students, or to a 4-year fast-track . The 4-year programme differs to the 5-year programme primarily in the first year, which has a stronger emphasis on problem-based learning and combines the core content of the first two years’ curriculum of the 5-year programme into one year.

 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS AND ELIGIBILITY

 

Degree and A levelss

 

For the 5-year programme, graduates should have a minimum of a 2:1 degree in any discipline. To show that they have the ability to cope with the scientific content of the course, they should either have:

 

• a significant component of Biology and Chemistry in their degree or:

• A level Chemistry and Biology to grade B

 

To apply to the 4-year programme, graduates should have at least a 2:1 in a scientific or healthcare discipline, with a significant component of Biology and Chemistry in their modules (to at least AS level). Graduates should have grades B in A level Biology and Chemistry if they have taken these prior to their degree, or they must complete AS levels in Biology and Chemistry with predicted grades of B in each subject.

 

GCSEss

 

There are no GCSE restrictions for graduates.

 

Admissions Exam

 

The UKCAT is required for all applicants to the 5-year programme and 6-year programme. The test is only valid for one year. Candidates must score above the third decile as a minimum.

 

Access to Medicine courses

 

Not accepted

 

International Students

 

There are 24 international places in total for both undergraduate and graduate places on the 5-year programme and the 4-year programme. Note that international graduates have additional application documents (see below). English Language requirements may be met by English Language GCSE at grade B or an IELTS score of 7.0 overall (sat within the last 2 years).

 

If you are applying as an overseas student and taken qualifications other than those listed above, please contact us by email (enquiries@themsag.com) if you would like more information on the minimum grades needed to be considered for a place in Medicine at Barts.

 

Policy on Re-applicants

 

There are no restrictions on re-applying to Bart’s, except that an applicant cannot re-apply within the same application cycle.

 

APPLICATION PROCESS

 

Application Deadlines

 

Applications via UCAS for 2017/18 entry for both programmes are open from 1st September 2016 and close on 15th October 2016

 

Application Documents

 

  • Completed UCAS application form
  • Graduates with non-UK degrees must also provide a transcript of their degree, as well as a statement of comparability from NARIC (www.naric.org) confirming that their degree is comparable to a UK degree.

 

SELECTION PROCESS AND INTERVIEW

 

Selection Process

 

For both the 5-year programme, and the 4-year programme, candidates who meet the minimum academic criteria will be ranked against the other graduate applicants applying in that year according to a 50:50 weighting applied to the UKCAT score and academic ability (measured using a points weighting of degree classification or postgraduate degrees). Note that candidates with UKCAT scores below the third decile will not be offered an interview. Cut-off UKCAT scores for interview vary each year, depending on the pool of applicants applying. The medical school emphasises the high importance of work and voluntary experience. Although not having this will not prevent you from getting to the interview stage; it is inevitable that questions about your work experience will be asked at interview. Once selected for interview, offers are based primarily on your performance at the interview stage, however the Situational Judgement section from your UKCAT exam may be assessed during your interview.

 

Interview

 

For the5-year programme, interviews are conducted by a panel of 2 academic/clinical members of staff, a medical student and sometimes a lay person. The interviewers are looking for you to demonstrate the following:

 

• Motivation and realistic approach to Medicine as a career

• Show initiative, resilience and maturity

• Work well as part of a team

• Be well organised and demonstrate problem solving abilities

• Likely contribution to university life

• Communicate effectively in a wide range of situations

 

Your personal statement is not scored but you can use it during your interview to show supporting evidence of the above criteria. Barts are looking for medical students who will not only participate academically, but also enthusiastically in university life and in the local community. Note that the Situational Judgement section from your UKCAT exam may be used as part of the interview assessment.

 

There are opportunities to be interviewed in London, Hong Kong and Singapore.

 

For the 4-year programme, interviews are held at an assessment centre where students are given different tasks to complete, including:

 

• a group task

• a written exercise

• a structured interview

 

One task used previously asked applicants to watch a recording of a consultation and answer related questions. This takes place in February and lasts half a day.

 

COMPETITION RATIOS

 

For entry to the 5-year programme in 2016, Barts received over 2300 applications (including both undergraduates and graduates), interviewed 996 candidates and made 500 offers for the 253 spaces available.

 

For entry to the 4-year programme in 2016, Barts received approximately 1500 applications, interviewed 200 candidates and made 60 offers for the 39 spaces available..

 

RANKINGS

 

Medicine at Barts and the London is ranked 5th in the UK by the Guardian University Guide 2016.

 

It is ranked 6th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2016.

 

It is among the top 100 medical schools in the QS World University Rankings.

 

Sumreen Butt,Year 1 student

 

1. What are the good things about studying Medicine at this university?

 

" The university has a very friendly and supportive environment. During freshers week, all new students are allocated a Barts Mum and Dad, who are senior students who have volunteered to help. During the whole year, any questions or problems I had, I spoke to my Barts parents first, who were incredibly helpful with lots of things, ranging from the best society to join to exam tips and past papers. The lecturers are also incredibly supportive, where after each module the students are welcome to provide feedback to improve the course, and the feedback we give is actually take on board. 

 

I really enjoyed how the course is designed, whereby a spiral model is used to teach us. Each module is revisited each year, however with more detail. I found this to be hard work but in the end very helpful as I was reminded of the same information several times, making it easier to learn. I also really like that Barts do clinical skills, OCSEs and GP placements from the first year, as these lay a solid foundation for the following years. 

 

Another thing I found incredibly helpful was that we were taught anatomy using both lectures and prosections, and then later in the year those who wanted to were able to choose dissection as part of their SSC (student selected component) which lasted 2 weeks. Once I had dissected, my anatomy vastly improved and I was also much more confident in my learning."

 

2. What is not so good about studying Medicine there?

 

"So much is integrated into the first year and therefore it can be very overwhelming, you basically hit the ground running, whereas other medical schools give first years a more relaxed environment. We cover a lot of material from the get go and have in-course assessments (ICA), which you have to pass to sit finals exams. This can get very stressful as not only are you learning from lectures but also PBLs, clinical skills classes, anatomy and physiology labs, GP placements, poster presentations, while preparing for upcoming ICA. That being said, once you get the hang of it, which usually happens after your first ICA, you build a pattern and a good revision plan, which helps you throughout medical school, and as the years gets more stressful, you’re well equipped to handle it. "

 

3. What advice do you have for someone thinking of studying Medicine there?

 

"Making sure they are ready to work hard and stay on top of their work, as it can easily snowball. 

 

Join lots of societies. If you manage your time well, there’s plenty of time for sports and other societies and they keep you more integrated and allow you to do other things that aren’t medicine. As we are part of Queen Mary University of London, there are many events and societies we can take part in, which allow you to be away from other medics too. "

 

4. Do you have any tips on how to get in?

 

"A good UKCAT score. Once you are offered an interview and given an article/issue to discuss. Make sure you can argue it from several sides with good reasoning. They don’t care much about what you think about homeopathy for example, they’re more interested in how you think. Not be scared. Barts have the nicest interviews ever. The panel are incredibly friendly, so just be yourself. "

 

Ask Dr Jiva a question

Contact Information

* Required Fields